CCTV – Help & Support

///CCTV – Help & Support
CCTV – Help & Support 2021-10-01T13:39:25+01:00
You can read the port-forwarding section in our PDF guide. If you’re still having trouble, contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk and we will do our best to help.
Sure. When you switch from one plan to another we’ll apply the change immediately and automatically pro-rate any pricing differences.
No. We offer monthly plans with no contract term. You simply pay as you go one month in advance and are free to cancel at anytime. Note — all our plans auto-renew until you cancel.
We accept all major credit/debit cards and PayPal. All transactions are secure and encrypted.
Our storage limits refer to the number of days we keep your media. If you have a 7 day plan, any recorded media from the last 7 days will be saved. Same rules apply for the 14, 30, 60 and 90 day plans.
We do not sell cameras. We allow our customers to purchase the camera of their choice while we remain focused on developing and providing a cloud service.
We use the term “webcam” to describe computer cameras that are connected (or built-in) to your PC/Mac. These are the cameras commonly used for Skype and other applications. IP cameras are standalone devices that normally connect over WiFi/Ethernet, also commonly referred to as “Network Cameras”.
We support any IP camera that supports MJPEG/H.264 streaming and has an FTP client for recording uploads. Check your camera documentation or contact support@unicomgroup.co.uk
No. We connect directly to the camera over the internet however our system does support NAS drives and SD cards (Edge Storage) if your cameras support these features.
Yes, all our paid plans include the ability to download individual recordings.
Yes, you can delete any individual media file. Note that we automatically delete any media older than your storage limit so we take care of this for you.
We have apps for Android and iOS. Our Android app supports version 4.0 or higher. Our iOS apps supports iOS 6 or higher.
You can get more familiar with Unicom HCV’s capabilities by looking through our help and support pages/knowledge base, or you can email us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk.
Not necessarily — it depends on the camera. For webcams, Axis and Foscam H.264 cameras (FI98* model numbers) we support video recordings. For all other cameras, if the camera can upload video clips via FTP (instead of images), we can support it. Many customers are surprised their camera only uploads images on a motion event rather than a video clip so be sure to verify this in your camera documentation.
Axis, Vivotek, Sony and Foscam are the leading IP camera brands in the market and we’ve gone the extra step to provide tight integration with these cameras. What that means is you can set the camera up easier with our auto-setup features, you can control many camera settings from our apps and we have the ability to capture video recordings for all Axis/Sony cameras and the newer H.264 Foscams.
Most free apps and software provided with cameras are “viewer apps” only — meaning you can view a single or small number of connected cameras. Unicom HCV provides this functionality, plus the ability to store recorded video in the cloud (we call this cloud storage), an easy-to-use interface to review your clips and manage all your devices within a single app. These features go well beyond the apps provided by camera manufacturers.
You will most likely need to port-forward your camera through Unicom HCV. This isn’t required if you’re using a webcam or some Axis, Sony or Foscam “P” cameras, but for most other IP cameras it is. We’ve provided a port-forwarding guide that explains how to do this.
Keep in mind that if you want to access your camera (with or without Unicom HCV) from outside your network, this will be a necessity. If you simply want to use our cloud storage feature and FTP videos or images, this is not a requirement.
If you still want to use Unicom HCV without port forwarding and take advantage of cloud storage follow these steps:
1. When you add your camera with the Unicom HCV add camera wizard go to step 2 called Network.

2. Instead of filling in the network information, press the Skip button. This will mean you won’t be able to get a Live View of your camera but you can still save motion events.

3. Unicom HCV will provide FTP credentials for you to setup motion detection in your camera interface.

Typically older cameras are MJPEG cameras where newer ones have H.264 support. Your camera’s documentation should let you know what you have. Some support both. Typically it is better to use H.264 as it has better compression therefore saving you some bandwidth, however you can’t beat the responsiveness on a Live View with MJPEG cameras. Whatever you have, make sure to follow the guides appropriately.
No, it’s not necessary. If your IP changes frequently you can use a service like DDNS. Often this is provided as a free service from your camera.
If you get issues when trying to play any media on your timeline or receive an error message. Common reasons are typically corrupt video or images sent from the camera, and usually related to outdated firmware on your camera. Check and ensure your cameras firmware is up to date by going to the camera manufacturers website.
What is Unicom HCV?
Unicom HCV is a cloud video monitoring system that allows you to connect your camera online and save your recordings to be stored in the cloud. Our platform supports webcams and a wide variety of IP cameras from brands including Axis Communications, Foscam, Trendnet, Hikvision, Sony, D-Link, Wanscam, Tenvis, and Vivotek.

How do we work with 3rd party cameras?
Functionality varies depending on the device.
– Webcam Integration – cloud support for Webcams works through a software that has been implemented by Unicom HCV. This software enables your webcam to detect motion, then store that motion event to the cloud. This allows your recordings to be viewable in the Timeline and Clip Manager.
– Premium Integration – cloud support is provided for premium IP cameras such as Foscam, Sony, and Axis. For premium cameras, we rely on the camera itself to send us motion events, which can be done through FTP. Our service takes a motion event from the camera, processes it, then stores it in the cloud automatically. With “auto setup”, we automatically write settings to the camera to set it up.
– Generic Integration – cloud support is provided for generic IP cameras. For generic cameras, you have to manually go into the camera to enable motion detection to allow our service to take a motion event from the camera, process it, then store it in the cloud.
Note: P2P (Peer to Peer) is the easiest way to add a camera to Unicom HCV since you just need a UDID that’s provided by the camera. The downside is that P2P can have increased latency. If you do understand port forwarding we recommend that you do that instead.

Cloud Features offered by Unicom HCV:
– Cloud storage for your videos and images
– Scheduling – Create a Schedule for when to turn on/off your motion detection
– Notifications – Receive Motion Detection Alerts
– Motion Detection
– Pan/Tilt/Zoom functionality (if your camera supports it) – As the data streams through the cloud, the Live Stream will usually have up to a 6 second delay and also applies to your Pan/Tilt/Zoom functionality.
– A “Live View” interface that allows you to watch your recordings in real time
– Mobile App support for both Android and iOS that allows you to stream recordings from your mobile device. A notification system will allow you to keep an eye on motion detection events while on the go. All administrative tasks that can be done on the webpage, can also be accomplished in the mobile app such as adding cameras, turning motion detection on/off, and adding schedules.

Here are just a few examples of how customers use Unicom HCV.
1. Home and Pet Monitoring. If you have to leave your pet at home while going to work, you can use Unicom HCV’s service to monitor your pet.
2. Monitor your Business. You can use the Live View feature to check-up on your restaurant (or any business) while doing some paperwork in your office.
3. Securely Record Activity in the Cloud. Use the scheduling feature to turn on your IP camera whenever you leave your apartment for work, so that all motion activity is recorded and saved in the cloud. This feature, combined with motion notifications will give you the peace of mind you need while you’re away.

Continuous Recording (CR) is a mode of operation that allows for 24×7 recording of all video footage captured by your camera. This is different from Motion Recording (MR) that captures video or images only when the motion detection is triggered by the camera.

How does CR work?
CR creates a connection from your camera to our cloud servers and will record video 24×7. You can switch your camera from MR by editing your camera and selecting “Continuous Recording”. Doublecheck your settings and hit “Save”. Now your camera will constantly record video.

 

What cameras are supported?
Virtually all IP cameras are supported on our platform including (but not limited to) the well known brands below:
Hanwha Techwin (Samsung)
Axis
Amcrest
Foscam H264
Sony
VIVOTEK
Hikvision

Note that setup requires port forwarding your cameras. Cameras configured on Unicom HCV using MJPEG encoding are not supported for continuous recording at this time.

Will I still get motion alerts?
Yes. Motion recording will still be configured on the camera to ensure you are notified when there’s a motion event. Events will be marked with dark blue blocks on the Timeline. Motion alerts can also be disabled with our Schedule feature, just like cameras that are operating in MR mode.

 

How much bandwidth do I need?
Bandwidth is an important consideration when using CR. You will require sufficient upload bandwidth to ensure a constant stream of video data can be transferred from the camera to our cloud servers. The exact bandwidth consumed depends on the camera’s encoding abilities, but the general guidelines are below.

1. How do I add or edit my cameras?
All the camera controls are now available from the new camera list. To edit a camera, click the dropdown arrow next to the camera name. An edit option will appear. To add a camera, select “Add Camera” from the bottom of the camera list.

2. How can I watch multiple live streams?
To watch multiple live streams, simply “pop-out” the video into its own window. This can be done from the main media player or from the camera list. You can pop-out as many players as you wish and arrange them on your desktop.

3. How do I start a webcam?
The “Start Webcam” option is now available from the camera list dropdown menu.

4. Where can i enable/disable all my cameras?
From the main dropdown menu there is an option called “Turn Cameras Off” or “Turn Cameras On”. This will disable or enable recording and motion notifications for all cameras.

5. Can I watch recorded video from the pop-out window?
The pop-out is for live video playback only. To watch your recorded clips, select the camera on the Timeline, then navigate and click the motion event you wish to view. It will play back in the main media player.

6. How do I modify my Motion Detection (MD) Area?
If your camera supports MD area, these controls are now available by selecting the “gear” icon in the top-right corner of the main media player. When you click the gear icon, a “Motion Detection” menu option will appear that will open the MD controls.

7. Where can I control Pan-Tilt (PT)?
If your camera supports PT, these controls are now available by selecting the “gear” icon in the top-right corner of the main media player. When you click the gear icon, a “Pan-Tilt” menu option will appear that will open the PT controls.

Sometimes you want your camera to detect motion detection within a certain schedule. For example, only record motion events at home while I’m at the office from Mon-Fri 9am-5pm.
With the recording Schedule feature, you can:
• Create up to 10 individual schedules, each with 10 entries.
• Schedules can be applied to a single camera or multiple cameras.
• Supports all camera types.
• Each camera can be configured with Motion Detection On, Off or assigned to a specific Schedule.
• The Global Motion Detection On/Off button will still over-ride any individual camera schedules.
• This feature is available on the web, Android and iOS.
Note: This is a paid-only feature, though Free users still have basic scheduling that allows them to turn Motion Detection On/Off.

Under the “My Account” tab in “Settings”, you can set up the schedule of when each camera can start recording. You can give each camera multiple schedules if you would like.

Different ways that you can use it include turning a camera on after working hours, when you’re away from home, and having a camera on for 24 hours a day.

And that’s all you need to know about the Scheduling feature!

Users can leverage the ability to interact with their cameras onboard SD Card for supported camera models.
Select the camera with an SD card installed from your camera list and select the dropdown arrow. Select “Edge Storage” from the list.

The following settings can be configured from the Edge Storage Settings dialog window:
Redundant Storage: Setting Redundant Storage to ON will allow all the motion capture events to be uploaded to the SD Card and the Cloud concurrently.

Disk Status: Needs Formatting – when formatted in unsupported format.
Ready – SD card is mounted and ready to use. A usage indicator will show you the amount of available storage space on your card.
No Disk – the disk may be inserted incorrectly or not at all
Unmount/Mount: if you would like to unmount the SD card, select this option. The button should change to “Mount” and the Disk Status will change to “Unmounted”. Select Mount again to ready your disk for capturing motion events.
Format Disk: select the “Format Disk” button to change the disk file system. This will erase any current recordings. Note it’s absolutely necessary to format the SD card especially if it was used for something different. Every camera model has their own format.
Edge Storage Events: Setting to ON will allow all the events to be uploaded to the SD Card and the Cloud concurrently.
Quality: If your camera supports it, you can specify a different quality value for the SD card events.
Record Mode: If your camera supports it, you can either capture Continuous Recording or Motion detection events only.

Users can leverage the ability to store events on a NAS device. This allows for redundant storage in the case of an internet outage.
NAS Setup

1. Log into your account and go to Username -> Settings menu.

2. Click Add NAS

3. Fill in all the NAS information.
NAS Name – any label you want to give your NAS setup
Internal IP – This is the IP where the NAS is running. This must be on the same network as your camera. Share Name – i.e. myshare\myfolder Make sure you’ve created a share name on the NAS previously. If not you can still do this after this setup.
Note: Use different share names for different camera types to avoid conflicts. For example if you have Axis and Hanwha camera going to the same NAS use different share names: axisshare, hanwhashare. Also pay attention to sub-folders. This maybe represented in different ways. i.e. myshare\subdir or myshare/subdir
Username – This is the username of the NAS
Password – This is the password of the NAS

Attach a NAS to a camera

Now that we setup a NAS we can attach it to a camera.
1. Log into your account.
2. Select your camera and use the small arrow next to the name to bring up the menu. Select Edge Storage.

3. A new window will appear with SD card (if available) as the default. Select the NAS tab.

4. Select the NAS Device you created earlier and select Mount. You can use Test to verify it’s all working.
Note: When you first go to the NAS tab, you may see a Disk Status and it’s showing you can Unmount the device. However if you don’t see a NAS device in your list that means an existing NAS may have existed on the camera. In that case Unmount first then go ahead and add the NAS.
5. Make sure Edge Storage Events are ON and here you can select the Record Mode type. Continuous or Event triggers. This may vary by camera model. In addition you may see a Quality setting to apply to the NAS events.
6. Click Save to start storing to the NAS.
Viewing NAS Events

Note that not all camera models are able to show play or download events on the timeline. See below for camera model specifics.
1. Right next to the Go Live/Live button you will have a filter. Click filter to show specific storage locations. In this case select NAS.

2. Timeline will be populated with specific events. Note: this can take time to load events especially with a large time scale (i.e. 24 hrs)

3. In the diagram above there are several items being displayed.
• The first 3 cameras will show events but it doesn’t support playback. Therefore they are not clickable. In the current timeline only the “Hikvision D…” has some continuous recording events. However you can not click on them to play.
• The “Axis 5013” has some recent events. In the diagram above I’ve clicked one area in the timeline. It starts trying to load the events for playback (as shown with the diagonal stripes).
• Clicking on one area in the timeline will fetch a larger chunk of video for optimised playback.
• Any dark grey area as shown in the image above is an indication that either the NAS has failed to return the resulting event or there was a communication error with the NAS at that point.
4. Once any event plays you can download directly. Of course you can always just go to the NAS to pull any events as well.
Camera Model Specifics

Axis: Full support.

Hanwha: Port forwarded only supported at this time
• Does not support NAS playback. You can only see events in the timeline but to play them you need to get them from the NAS itself
• Sub directories for the NAS share are not supported

Vivotek:
• Configuration of events to the NAS but you cannot list them on the timeline. You need to go to your NAS device.

Hikvision:
• Does not support NAS playback. You can only see events in the timeline but to play them you need to get them from the NAS itself.

Amcrest:
• No support for NAS

There are 2 parts to setting up notifications on Unicom HCV. The first part is setting up notifications by adding an email to your account. This email will be used to receive motion alerts.

Highlight the your menu with your name and clicking on “Settings”.

Go on “Notifications” and insert your email. Click on “Add Email”, and that’s it!

Now for the 2nd part, you will be setting up notifications for each individual IP camera that you already have setup. Once the camera is setup, click on the “Edit Camera” button.

The box below should appear.

For each individual camera, you can turn On/Off Motion Detection notifications and/or Camera Health Check notifications. If you have your notifications for a certain camera turned off, you won’t be getting motion alerts for that camera. Keep in mind that the camera will still be recording.

That’s it!

Setting up a static IP and DNS:
It’s highly recommended you setup an internal static IP address for your camera (not to be confused with an external static IP you purchase from your ISP) with a properly configured DNS. This will ensure your camera always has the same IP address on your network should the router reboot for any reason.

Once you enable an internal static IP address you will also then need to provide some DNS information. The way to do this varies by camera, however if you go to the Network Settings, you should find the options similar to the D-Link example below.
• IPv4 Address – this will be an internal address of your camera on your network
• Subnet mask – typically you can leave this as the default 255.255.255.0
• Default Gateway – this is the internal address of your router
• DNS – you can use any public DNS, in this case we use 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 from Google

Setting up DDNS:

Your Internet Service Provider might change your IP. If they do that your networking will not work. You can use 3rd party vendors such as DynDNS or you can just use the hostname provided by your camera. Most cameras today will give you a DDNS address you can use. Use that instead of your IP. Just enable it on the camera, here’s an example with a Foscam camera:

Don’t forget to use the hostname instead of the IP when you add that camera on Unicom HCV.

To change your Timezone or User Profile, highlight the “My Account” tab and go to Settings.

Click on the drop down menu under Timezone, and select whichever timezone applies. Don’t forget to click on “Apply” when you’re done!

To change your Profile, click on “Edit Profile & Password” under the “My Account Menu”.

Here you can change or update your name, password, and email. Once you’re done, hit the “Submit” button, and you’re good to go!

We’ve made our Network Testing process more user-friendly with a list of some new error codes. Here’s what each error means:

HTTP Forwarding Error:
1. Most likely:
– The HTTP port is the wrong port number.
– The HTTP port is not forwarded correctly.
– Port is forwarded, but the HTTP Port is not valid.
2. Less likely:
– IP is wrong (this would never happen unless your camera is set up on a different network than the computer you’re accessing Unicom HCV from).
3. You may have chosen the wrong camera type in the “Camera Info” section of the setup wizard.

RTSP Forwarding Error:
1. Most likely:
– RTSP port is the wrong port number.
– The RTSP port is not forwarded correctly.
– Port is forwarded but not a valid RTSP port.
2. Less likely: IP is wrong (this would never happen unless your camera is set up on a different network than the computer you’re accessing Unicom HCV from).
3. You may have chosen the wrong camera type in the “Camera Info” section of the setup wizard.

Username/Password Error:
– Username and/or Password is not the correct credentials for the camera
Note: The camera’s username and password differs from the username and password you’ve set for your Unicom HCV account.
HTTP Path Error:
– The Path you’ve supplied is not valid. Consult your camera’s documentation.
RTSP Path Error:
– The path you’ve supplied is not valid. Consult your camera’s documentation.

Not Tested:
If any test is “not tested”, it simply means the test is unable to begin.

Still having trouble? Contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

The Unicom HCV platform supports the AAC audio format for use on our web and mobile applications. Not all cameras support this standard so audio support is dependent on the hardware you are using with Unicom HCV.

Here is a quick summary of where we can support audio based on our testing of a select few cameras:

Note: One exception to note is that Foscam cameras do not have audio with the Live View on mobile apps due to the audio encoding.

This guide is intended for the following audience:
– any IP camera user who wants to access live video from their camera with Unicom HCV (Hosted Cloud Video)
– if you simply want to use Unicom HCV’s cloud storage feature with an IP camera, this guide is not applicable
– this guide assumes you know your camera’s IP address and it has been successfully configured on your network

In order for Unicom HCV to access live video from your camera, the camera needs to be accessible from outside your network. There is a fairly simple process to accomplish this known as “port forwarding”. These are the basic steps to follow:
1. Login to your camera’s admin interface and go to the network settings area. Confirm what port has been assigned to your camera. Often it will be port 554, 80 or 88 but could be anything. It is recommended to stay away from port 80, so change it to something >1024 (doesn’t really matter what port you use but better to pick a high number and stay away from any reserved ports).
2. Now login to your router and look for a menu called ‘port forwarding’ (sometimes it will be under an “Application and Gaming” menu). Once in this menu, create a rule to forward the port selected from Step (1) to the internal (192.168.x.x or 10.x.x.x) IP address of your camera. Be sure to assign the port number to both the internal and external ports. If there is a protocol option, choose TCP or BOTH.
3. If you are using multiple cameras then you need to select a unique port number for each camera. For example, Camera1=Port 1025, Camera2=Port 1026, etc.
Example router settings:

 

More Resources:
– A great website that has a wealth of resources is portforward.com.
– They also publish port forwarding guides for virtually every router.
If you’re still having problems here are a number of tips and tricks that might help:
Tip #1: Know the ports
First of all it is important to know what port you need to forward. This depends on the type of camera. For example if you are setting up a Foscam camera typically you only need one port, HTTP (usually port 80 or 88 in the case of Foscam). Some cameras will require you to setup the RTSP port (usually port 554). Some require BOTH the RTSP and HTTP port. If you are setting up your camera on Unicom HCV, it will ask you for one or both of the ports and that is how you will know what to port forward. Log into your camera’s web interface to verify the ports that are used.

Tip #2: Use help resources
If you are a total newbie with port forwarding, don’t be scared. It is quite easy, you just need the proper resource. If you Google search your router name along with “port forwarding” often you will find documentation from your router. But even better, just go to http://portforward.com. This site has an extensive list of routers and applications you can use to help you understand how to port forward for your router. The key here is to navigate to your router (the link above gives you a direct link to the router list), skip all the ads then select an example camera. For example select any Foscam or D-Link in the list. This may not be your camera but the point is just to see how a port is forwarded.
Tip #3: Port 80 is evil
Many cameras by default use port 80. Bad idea. Everything uses port 80. Avoid conflicts with other devices by changing this. I’ve even seen some ISPs forbid this. In fact many ports under 1024 are already reserved. Save yourself the headache and just change it now to something >1024. Simply log into your camera’s web interface, find the HTTP or RTSP port (depending which one you are using) and change accordingly. Remember if you change the HTTP port to access your camera locally add the port, for example: 192.168.1.20:8080.
Tip #4: Multiple cameras
If you have more than one camera you can’t use the same port. You will need to increment accordingly. If you have one camera setup on port 8080, change the next one to 8081 and so on.
Tip #5: Enable button
In the screen shot above I can’t tell you how many times someone has just forgotten to “Enable” the rule. Many routers let you create the rule, but don’t actually turn it on or “enable” it. Sometimes this is a checkbox or simply a button to apply settings.
Tip #6: Buggy routers
Some routers have bugs. This is reality. I’ve found several routers that have caused me tons of pain. Typically they have come from the ISP branding their own device. For example here at work we have a Bell router. Took me a long time to figure out but when you create a rule and name that rule you can’t use spaces. So for this router I would select “Create a new rule” I would name the rule “Unicom HCV camera” because seemingly it can be anything. Then I fill out the rest. Awesome it works. The gotcha is that the next rule you create won’t work. Intuitive no?
Tip #7: Create rule or custom application
In the screen shot above it shows some default “rules” or “applications”. Those will never match what you need. Sometimes it lists tons of applications such as games. They are trying to help you along the way by providing some default ports. You don’t need this. So in most cases you will have to “Create a new rule” as shown above or in many cases you will need to create a new “application”.
Tip #8: Test it works
How do you know your port forwarding works? Try any one of the many port checking tools on the web. I like using the one from yougetsignal. Enter in the port you just forwarded and that’s it. It will tell you if it is open (success!) or closed (you failed!).
This might seem like a lot to know. But it really is simple as long as your router behaves as it should. Hope these tips help.

This article explains how to setup an Axis Communications IP camera (firmware 5.5+) with Unicom HCV to enable cloud storage and other features.

Step #1. Add Camera Wizard

First Login to Unicom HCV. Click on the “TIMELINE” tab. This is where you’ll have a list of any cameras you’ve already setup.

Click on “Add Camera” and pick “Axis”. You can name your camera whatever you’d like. Once you click on next, you’ll have to add in your camera’s username, password, IP address, HTTPS and RTSP ports. This means both your RTSP and HTTPS ports need be forwarded on your router. Once you have an Axis camera on your network, you can find the IP address. (Note: To enable HTTPS on an Axis camera, go to Advanced TCP/IP settings and ensure the HTTPS port is set to whatever you like (default 443). To enable HTTPS go to System Options -> Security -> HTTPS. Use “client: for the certificate”. Change administrator to use HTTPS only or HTTP & HTTPS. Now it can be added to Unicom HCV using HTTPS.)

Click on Next.
Unicom HCV’s video stream supports 480p, 720p, and 1080p. Since my camera supports 1080p, we can change the video quality stream setting here to 1080p. This is where you can also change whether or not you’d like notifications, and the sensitivity of your camera’s motion detection. Once you’re done, click on “Finish”.

Now the setup wizard is going to run through its process and confirm that it completed the configuration successfully. If you’re having trouble setting up your camera, contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

Step #2. Setup Your Motion Detection Area and Pan/Tilt Functionality

Since the setup is complete, it will get added to your list of cameras. Click on “Go Live!” and see if it works.
You can take a look at what’s happening right now from “Go Live!”. You can also change the camera’s positioning through its Pan/Tilt Functionality by clicking on the cog if your camera supports it.

Setup the camera’s Motion Detection by clicking on the Motion Detection under the cog. To change the camera’s motion detection area, move the red box around, increase or decrease its size, then click on “Save Area”.
Step #3. Make Sure Your Timeline Page is Getting Populated
The timeline will populate any event that happens with a blue bar. You can also download the clip if you’d like by clicking on the download button.

Whenever there’s motion activity, your video and image recordings will be saved and stored in the cloud which allows you to access it from anywhere, including your Android or iOS device.
That’s it for the setup! If you have any questions, contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

Note: Before starting, make sure that you’ve port-forwarded your camera. If you’re unsure how to start the port-forwarding process, take a look at our guide. If you’re still having trouble, you can contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

Step #1. Start the “Add Camera” Wizard

First Login to Unicom HCV. Click on the “TIMELINE” tab. This is where you’ll have a list of any cameras you’ve already setup.

Click on “Add Camera”, select “Vivotek”, and pick your model. Name your camera whatever you’d like.

Once you click on next, you’ll have to add in your camera’s username, password, IP address, RTSP port, and HTTP port. This means your RTSP & HTTP ports need to be forwarded on your router.

Click on Next.

This is where you can also change whether or not you’d like notifications, and the sensitivity of your camera’s motion detection. Once you’re done, click on “Finish”.

Now the setup wizard is going to run through its process and confirm that it completed the configuration successfully. If you’re having trouble setting up your camera, contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

Step #2. Setup Your Motion Detection Area and Pan/Tilt Functionality

Since the setup is complete, it will get added to your list of cameras. Click on “Live” and see if it works.
You can take a look at what’s happening right now from “Live”. You can also change the camera’s positioning through its Pan/Tilt Functionality by clicking on the cog if your camera supports it. If your camera doesn’t support it, the cog may not give you that option.

Setup the camera’s Motion Detection by clicking on the cog and selecting “Motion Detection”. To change the camera’s motion detection area, move the red box around, increase or decrease its size, then click on “Save Area”.
Step #3. Make Sure Your Timeline Page is Getting Populated
Go over to the Timeline page to see if any recordings were saved. The timeline will populate any event that happens with a blue bar. You can also download/delete a clip if you’d like by highlighting the event, then clicking on the download/delete button.

Whenever there’s motion activity, your video and image recordings will be saved and stored in the cloud which allows you to access it from anywhere, including your Android or iOS device.
That’s it for the setup! If you have any questions, contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

Note: Before starting, make sure that you’ve port-forwarded your camera. If you’re unsure how to start the port-forwarding process, take a look at our guide. If you’re still having trouble, you can contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

Step #1. Start the “Add Camera” Wizard

First Login to Unicom HCV. Click on the “TIMELINE” tab. This is where you’ll have a list of any cameras you’ve already setup.

Click on “Add Camera”, select “Sony”, and pick your model. Name your camera whatever you’d like.

Once you click on next, you’ll have to add in your camera’s username, password, IP address, RTSP port, and HTTPS port. This means your RTSP & HTTPS ports need to be forwarded on your router. (Note: To enable HTTPS on your Sony camera, go to Security -> SSL. Switch SSL function to Enable. You must also either have an SSL certificate or use a self-signed certificate (must be generated with the generate button). Click OK. Now HTTPS is enabled on the Sony camera using port 443.)

Click on Next.

This is where you can also change whether or not you’d like notifications, and the sensitivity of your camera’s motion detection. Once you’re done, click on “Finish”.

Now the setup wizard is going to run through its process and confirm that it completed the configuration successfully. If you’re having trouble setting up your camera, contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

Step #2. Setup Your Motion Detection Area and Pan/Tilt Functionality

Since the setup is complete, it will get added to your list of cameras. Click on “Go LIVE!” and see if it works.
You can take a look at what’s happening right now from “Go Live!”. You can also change the camera’s positioning through its Pan/Tilt Functionality by clicking on the cog if your camera supports it.

Setup the camera’s Motion Detection by clicking on the cog and highlighting Motion Detection. To change the camera’s motion detection area, move the red box around, increase or decrease its size, then click on “Save Area”.
Step #3. Make Sure Your Timeline Page is Getting Populated
You can see any recordings that were saved from here. The timeline will populate any event that happens with a blue bar. You can also download the clip if you’d like by clicking on the download button.

Whenever there’s motion activity, your video and image recordings will be saved and stored in the cloud which allows you to access it from anywhere, including your Android or iOS device.
That’s it for the setup! If you have any questions, contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

This article explains how to setup a Foscam H.264 IP camera with Unicom HCV to enable cloud storage and other features.
Note: Before starting, make sure that you’ve port-forwarded your camera. If you’re unsure how to start the port-forwarding process, take a look at our guide. If you’re still having trouble, you can contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

Step #1. Start the “Add Camera” Wizard

First Login to Unicom HCV. Click on the “TIMELINE” tab. This is where you’ll have a list of any cameras you’ve already setup.

Click on “Add Camera” and pick “Foscam”. Choose your camera model, then name your camera whatever you’d like.

Once you click on next, you’ll have to add in your camera’s username, password, IP address, and HTTPS port (and in some models the RTSP port as well). This means your HTTPS (and RTSP) port needs be forwarded on your router. (Note: To enable HTTPS on a Foscam, go to Network -> Port, assign a port (e.g. default is 443). This is the port that must be forwarded on your router.)

Click on Next.

This is where you can also change whether or not you’d like notifications, and the sensitivity of your camera’s motion detection. Once you’re done, click on “Finish”.

Now the setup wizard will configure your chosen settings and close. If you’re having trouble setting up your camera, contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk.

Step #2. Setup Your Motion Detection Area and Pan/Tilt Functionality

Since the setup is complete, it will get added to your list of cameras. Click on “Go Live!” and see if it works.
You can take a look at what’s happening right now from the “Go Live!” tab. You can also change the camera’s positioning through its Pan/Tilt Functionality by clicking on the cog if your camera supports it.

Setup the camera’s Motion Detection by clicking on the cog and selecting Motion Detection. To change the camera’s motion detection area, move the red box around, increase or decrease its size, then click on “Save Area”.

Step #2. Make Sure Your Timeline Page is Getting Populated
The timeline will populate any event that happens with a blue bar. You can also download the clip if you’d like by clicking on the download button.

Whenever there’s motion activity, your video and image recordings will be saved and stored in the cloud which allows you to access it from anywhere, including your Android or iOS device.
That’s it for the setup! If you have any questions, contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

Tip: MJPEG or H.264, which one do I choose? Typically older cameras are MJPEG cameras where newer ones have H.264 support. Consult your camera’s documentation. Some support both.
There are 3 general steps required to setup an MJPEG IP camera with Unicom HCV.
1. Camera Info. Select your camera type (in this case, Generic MJPEG).
2. Network. This is where you give Unicom HCV the camera’s login credentials, IP address and port. It requires port forwarding to work with IP cameras.
3. Settings. Some final camera settings, including obtaining FTP credentials from Unicom HCV that need to be entered into the camera’s FTP settings area.

1. Camera Info.

This step allows you to select the type of camera you wish to setup with Unicom HCV, then give it a name (e.g. “Front Door Camera”). When setting up an IP camera, select Generic MJPEG as the type (note: Axis and Foscam have their own, more automated setup steps).

2. Network

If you have not setup the camera on your network with port forwarding, please STOP HERE. Read our Port Forwarding Guide for instructions on this before proceeding further.

It’s also highly recommended you setup a static IP address for your camera with a properly configured DNS. This will ensure your camera always has the same IP address on your network should the router reboot for any reason. Read our Static IP & DNS Setup Guide.

Once you’ve done this, complete the rest of the form.

– The username and password are the camera’s login credentials.

– The external IP will already be filled in with your current IP but you should verify it is correct – an easy way to accomplish this is to Google “my IP”. A better option is to register with a dynamic DNS provider such as DynDNS and enter the domain name. (Tip: Many cameras already provide a free DDNS service with the purchase of your camera. Check first!)

– Port is the HTTP port you assigned to this camera.

– Finally select your camera to identify a “camera path”. If you selected Generic MJPEG, start typing your camera’s model (e.g. D-Link). This will auto-complete based on the Unicom HCV supported cameras. You can fill this in manually, search for MJPEG stream in your camera documentation. If you don’t see your camera name in the camera list or you are unsure of the path to use then contact support.

Tip: The MJPEG path will look something like this: /videostream.cgi or /channel1. Your documentation might show a full path of the IP and port, but you only want to enter the path after that. For example if your documentation says: http://xx.xx.xx.xx:80/videostream.cgi, you only want to enter the path of: /videostream.cgi into the path field.

Save the FTP server name, username, and password, you’ll need it for the next step!

Once you complete this form select “Next”. Unicom HCV will run a network test to ensure we can connect to your camera before proceeding to Step 3. If it goes through it means you were successful at pinging the camera which means our Network Setup is complete.
Now you’re ready to use the Live View with your Generic MJPEG camera.

3. Settings.

Once your camera is setup on your network there are a few remaining settings required in order to add cloud storage of your motion events.

First, configure your camera to send motion events. This varies per camera but typically involves three steps:
• Input FTP credentials. Your camera will have a place to enter the FTP credentials. Take the credentials provided to you when you created the camera. Enter the address, your credentials, port (21) and make sure to select passive mode if you have that option.

Tip: Some cameras ask for you to enter a path or upload folder. Typically this can be left empty but some cameras require this option to be filled in. In that case enter anything like “videos” or forward slash (/).
• Enable motion detection – most cameras simply have a checkmark or something that says: yes, please send motion events. Here you will create “Motion events” or “Action” or “Snapshot” to trigger an event to that FTP. It varies per camera. You might also have something called “Interval” which must be set to specify the number of seconds between motion events, keep the number low.
• Create motion detection area. Some cameras require you to draw the areas of where you want it to detect motion. Many cameras don’t have this option but if you do you typically find it under the motion detection options.

Once you’ve added the supplied FTP credentials to your camera’s configuration, you’re ready to start using your IP camera with Unicom HCV!

This article explains how to setup a H.264 IP camera with Unicom HCV to enable cloud storage and other features.
Tip: MJPEG or H.264, which one do I choose? Typically older cameras are MJPEG cameras where newer ones have H.264 support. Consult your camera’s documentation. Some support both.

First you want to get your IP camera on your network. Follow your camera’s documentation to complete this step.

The video below gives you a full demo, using a Hikvision camera as an example. After the video, follow the step-by-step instructions explained in the article.

First login to Unicom HCV and go to the “Timeline” page.

There are 3 general steps required to setup an H.264 IP camera with Unicom HCV.
1. Camera Info. Select your camera type (in this case, Generic H.264).
2. Network. This is where you give Unicom HCV the camera’s login credentials, IP address and port. It requires port forwarding to work with IP cameras.
3. Settings. Some final camera settings, including obtaining FTP credentials from Unicom HCV that need to be entered into the camera’s FTP settings area.

1. Camera Info.

This step allows you to select the type of camera you wish to setup with Unicom HCV, then give it a name (e.g. “Front Door Camera”). When setting up an IP camera, select Generic H.264 as the type.

2. Network

If you have not setup the camera on your network with port forwarding, please STOP HERE. Read our Port Forwarding Guide for instructions on this before proceeding further.

It’s also highly recommended you setup a static IP address for your camera with a properly configured DNS. This will ensure your camera always has the same IP address on your network should the router reboot for any reason. Read our Static IP & DNS Setup Guide.

Once you’ve done this, complete the rest of the form.

– The username and password are the camera’s login credentials.

– The external IP will already be filled in with your current IP but you should verify it is correct – an easy way to accomplish this is to Google “my IP”. A better option is to register with a dynamic DNS provider such as DynDNS and enter the domain name. Some details can be found here. (Tip: Many cameras already provide a free DDNS service with the purchase of your camera. Check first!)

– Port is the RTSP port you assigned to this camera, typically 554.

– Finally select your camera to identify a “RTSP path”. Search for RTSP stream in your camera documentation. Start typing your camera’s model (e.g. Hikvision). This will auto-complete based on the Unicom HCV supported cameras. If your camera is not in the list, try “Generic” or “Generic2” or you can leave this field blank and enter any RTSP URL. If you’re still not sure what your RTSP URL is, just contact support@unicomgroup.co.uk and we’ll help you figure it out.

Tip: The RTSP path will look something like this: /videostream.cgi or /channel1. Your documentation might show a full path of the IP and port, but you only want to enter the path after that. For example if your documentation says: rtsp://xx.xx.xx.xx:554/channel1, you only want to enter the path of: /channel1 into the path field.

Once you complete this form select “Next”. Unicom HCV will run a network test to ensure we can connect to your camera before proceeding to Step 3. (Alert: Some cameras may support H.264 (i.e. they have a RTSP path) but give invalid streams. For example some D-Link and TrendNet models. You may be able to set them up but you will find the Live View will not work on the web or mobile. In that case select Generic MJPEG as your camera type.)

If it goes through it means you were successful at pinging the camera which means our Network Setup is complete.
Now you’re ready to use the Live View with your Generic H.264 camera.
3. Settings.

Once your camera is setup on your network there are a few remaining settings required in order to add cloud storage of your motion events.

First, configure your camera to send motion events. This varies per camera but typically involves three steps:
• Input FTP credentials. Your camera will have a place to enter the FTP credentials. Take the credentials provided to you when you created the camera. Enter the address, your credentials, port (21) and make sure to select passive mode if you have that option.

Tip: Some cameras ask for you to enter a path or upload folder. Typically this can be left empty but some cameras require this option to be filled in. In that case enter anything like “videos” or forward slash (/).

• Enable motion detection – most cameras simply have a checkmark or something that says: yes, please send motion events. Here you will create “Motion events” or “Action” or “Snapshot” to trigger an event to that FTP. It varies per camera. You might also have something called “Interval” which must be set to specify the number of seconds between motion events, keep the number low.
• Create motion detection area. Some cameras require you to draw the areas of where you want it to detect motion. Many cameras don’t have this option but if you do you typically find it under the motion detection options.

Once you’ve added the supplied FTP credentials to your camera’s configuration, you’re ready to start using your IP camera with Unicom HCV!

Got questions? Contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

First you want to get your Trendnet camera on the network. Follow your camera’s documentation.
Now follow the Generic MJPEG documentation to set up your camera on Unicom HCV.
To enable cloud storage with Unicom HCV you will need to setup motion detection with your Trendnet. Going to the Motion Detection tab and select “Enable Video Motion” and then drag your mouse over the camera window. Motion will be detected within the area that you select, and will be ignored outside it. I normally select the entire window. Hit Apply.

Now go to the Action tab and Video Clip. Remember the credentials you have for your FTP camera, enter them here. Note: Select the “Test” button which will verify you have entered the credentials correctly.

You are all setup for motion detection with Unicom HCV. Wave in front of your camera and then go to the Unicom HCV Timeline page or start a Live View.

Note: Before starting, make sure that you’ve port-forwarded your camera. If you’re unsure how to start the port-forwarding process, take a look at our guide for some guidance. If you’re still having trouble, you can contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

First you want to get your Tenvis camera on the network. Follow your camera’s documentation.
Now follow the Generic MJPEG documentation to set up your camera on Unicom HCV.

Update Your Camera’s FTP Settings!

Login to your camera by putting the camera’s IP Address into your address bar.

On the right hand corner, click on settings, then “Alarm”, then “FTP Alarm”.

Replace the FTP server, user, and password with the credentials you received from Unicom HCV.

Now click on “Alarm”. Under Motion Detection, make sure “IP Camera Build-in” and “Video Recording” are both checked.

Now let’s make sure it works!
Make Sure Your Timeline Page is Getting Populated!
Go over to the Timeline page to see if any recordings were saved. The timeline will populate any event that happens with a blue bar. You can also download the clip if you’d like by clicking on the download button.

Whenever there’s motion activity, your video and image recordings will be saved and stored in the cloud which allows you to access it from anywhere, including your Android or iOS device.
That’s it for the setup! If you have any questions, contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

Let’s show you how to setup a Hikvision Camera with Unicom HCV.

Try following the video guide and if unsuccessful please follow the steps below.

Step #1. Setup the Camera as Generic H.264
First setup the camera on Unicom HCV as a Generic H.264. Follow the Generic H.264 documentation making sure to select the camera model as “Hikvision” during the setup wizard.
Before you head over to the interface, make sure you’ve taken note of your FTP Credentials. You can find them on the cameras page here:

Tip: When we we first pop-up the dialogue to enter your FTP Credentials, we say ftp.hostedcloudvideo.com is what you should use, but that doesn’t always work for Hikvision Cameras. If it doesn’t you can enter this IP: 54.221.201.14

Step #2: Hikvision FTP Setup
Now go to the Hikvision Camera Interface and click on the “Configuration” tab, then under “Advanced Configuration” click on “Network”. Now click on the FTP tab.

This is where your FTP credentials are required. Keep in mind that the interface as of now doesn’t allow you to copy and paste the passwords in, so you’ll have to manually enter them both times.
Make sure the “Upload Picture” checkbox at the bottom is checked. Click on “test”, if it’s successful it means that you’ve configured with FTP correctly.

Step #3: Hikvision Interface Event and Storage Configuration
Once again under “Advanced Configuration”, click on “Events”. Make sure your Motion Detection is enabled and that you have a Motion Detection Area selected.

Scroll down, and under Linkage Method make sure “Upload to FTP” is checked.

The Last Step is to jump over to “Storage”, and click on the Snapshot tab. Scroll down and check on the “Enable Event-Triggered Snapshot” checkbox.

Now you’re ready to use cloud storage with Unicom HCV and your Hikvision camera. Now when there’s motion in front of the camera, you’ll be able to see what kind of motion activity was captured by the device.
Got questions? Contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk

Setting up a Lorex camera is no different than the process of setting up a Generic MJPEG camera.
One special note with Lorex cameras is that some models are defaulting to the MPEG4 stream instead of MJPEG. You just need to go into device setup and change the “Video Streaming” to a MJPEG stream. This will then allow Unicom HCV to work with the Live View.

Take note that the default ports vary. Often cameras use the same HTTP port and MJPEG port. In the case of this screen shot the Lorex LNE series camera has the default HTTP port as 80 (quite typical) but also has a different MJPEG port at 8070. Port 8070 is what you will need to port forward in this case to have the Unicom HCV Live View work.

This article explains how to setup a VIVOTEK IP camera with Unicom HCV to enable cloud storage and other features.
Vivotek has great quality and tons of features but the setup can be a bit tricky. This article will walk you through the main steps.
Note: Once your VIVOTEK is on your network, follow the Automatic Setup for Vivotek documentation to add your camera on Unicom HCV, then return to this article which explains how to configure motion detection on your VIVOTEK.
The quickest way to get the camera on your network is through their Software utilities and click on Installation Wizard 2 (twice). This should install a program on your computer.

Now open up Installation Wizard 2 which should be installed on your computer and it will look like:

The next two tabs for ports and DDNS can be skipped for now (more info available in our network settings guide if required). You will receive a popup about Mobile access setup, you can select No for now.

Here is where it will find your device. Now select that device and select the two arrow button to open further options. Now you can select “Manual setup”.

You can try the “Smart Setup” button which is easier but this rarely works correctly. Okay, moving on, it will then ask you to setup a password for root. A dialog will ask you to setup PPoE, select No.

Setup the IP, we recommend creating a static IP for this camera and more importantly adding DNS servers. Select an IP value, it doesn’t really matter what value you use and make sure to use the appropriate value of your router. This varies depending on the router type, for example:

For DNS use 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4.

Then it asks you to setup wireless. Simply enter your wireless details and you’re ready to go. Be careful with these settings make sure you know what types of options you have for your wireless. Finally “Apply” the changes.

Wait until all processing is done and then you can unplug the LAN cable, You should be on wireless now.

A new window should open like the one below with a link to your camera’s admin page. If not, just enter in the camera IP you created earlier into the browser. In our case it was 192.168.1.205.

You should see a view of the camera and at the very bottom on the left should be a “Configuration” link. Click that to go into the camera configuration. Also at the bottom with be another link called “Advanced mode”. Select that and new menus will appear.

Setup your camera on Unicom HCV by following the Generic MJPEG guide.

Now we can go back to the Vivotek interface and setup up motion detection (again remember IE is your best bet). Going to the Motion Detection tab you need select “Enable motion detection” and click the New button. This will create a new motion window area to detect motion. Enter a name for the window. Motion will be detected within the area that you select, and will be ignored outside it. I normally select the entire window. Increase sensitivity and percentage. The percentage meaning the variation between sequential images (think of this like the size of the object); play around with these settings for optimal motion detection but a good starting point I found was 90% for sensitivity and 20% for percentage). Hit Save.

Now go to the Application tab and click the Add button for an Event Setting.
– Add an Event name (anything)
– Click “Enable this event”
– Select the trigger “Video motion detection” and select the motion detection window you created

When your done it should look something like this:

Before you hit Save, you need to “Add Server” at the bottom. Remember the credentials you have for your FTP camera, enter them here. Note: Select the “Test” button which will verify you have entered the credentials correctly.

Now hit Save for your Server Settings (It doesn’t actually close the window, so you need to do that).

Next we need to add media with the “Add Media” button (which was next to “Add Server” button). Here I changed it to Video Clip, changed to Stream 2 and changed Maximum duration to 10. I would also add pre-event recording to 1 or 2 seconds and change the Max file size to 800 to give you the longest possible video. Save and Close.

Now you will have to go back into your Event settings and at the bottom select both the Server and Media options you created. This is quite confusing and I found that I had to start it over again. Once you do sort that out hit Save for your Event Settings. This is what it should look like:

One more thing to do. You need to configure the Vivotek MJPEG stream to be used for the Unicom HCV Live View. We need to change stream profile 3 to handle that. Go to the “Audio and video” tab. Select “Video quality settings for stream 3:” and select JPEG as the stream and hit Save.

You are all setup for motion detection with Unicom HCV. Wave in front of your camera and then go to the Unicom HCV Timeline page.

One extra special note of importance. You may find that your videos are quite small, in the range of 3-4 secs. Vivotek allows 10 sec videos but they bump up quality settings so it ends up being too big to send. You can go to the Audio and video tab and change Stream profile 2 settings. A quick example would be to set the default 30 fps to 20 fps. Play around with these and you will find the right combination for your needs

This article explains how to setup a D-Link IP camera with Unicom HCV to enable cloud storage and other features.
First you want to get your D-Link camera on the network. Follow your camera’s documentation.
Now follow the Generic MJPEG documentation to set up your camera on Unicom HCV, then return to this article which explains how to configure motion detection on your D-Link.
Note: Some D-link cameras have slightly different interfaces, so we will be labelling the images as “Interface #1” (D-Link DCS942L) and “Interface #2” (D-Link DCS2332). The instructions remain the same for both.
Login to your D-Link camera and go to the Video Clip tab. Remember the credentials you have for your FTP camera, enter them here. Make sure to set “Trigger by” to “Motion”. Note: Oddly some D-Link models don’t have a “Test” button for the FTP which is quite annoying. So the only way to know if the FTP credentials is working is to check the system logs (found under the Status -> Log tab). But if you do have a “Test” button make sure things are working now.

Now let’s setup up motion detection. Going to the Motion Detection tab you need select “Enable Video Motion” and then drag your mouse over the camera window. Motion will be detected within the area that you select, and will be ignored outside it. I normally select the entire window. Save Settings.

Interface: #1

Interface #2

That’s it. If you follow these steps you will have your D-Link setup with motion detection recordings.

First Login to Unicom HCV. Click on the “TIMELINE” tab. This is where you’ll have a list of any cameras you’ve already setup.

Click on “Add Camera”, select “Sony”, and pick your model. Name your camera whatever you’d like.

Since you’re adding your camera manually, make sure to turn off Auto Setup. Put in your RTSP port.

Setup your camera on Unicom HCV, and make sure to save the FTP server name, Username, and password in any separate document, you’ll need them for later.

Now login to your Camera. Enter your camera’s IP address into your address bar and login using the camera’s credentials.

Tip: If you’re having trouble logging into your camera, try using Internet Explorer as your browser.

It’s time to update the FTP Settings.

Under Setting, click on Action Output, and go to FTP still Image Sending.

Replace the FTP server, username, and password with the information you received from Unicom HCV after setting up the camera.

Now go to Action Output, and click on Execution Condition. Make sure “Motion Detection” is selected for “FTP still Image Sending”.

Now go to action input, click on the Motion Detection tab, then on VMD settings.

This is your motion detection zone. If you want to cover the entire screen, grab the corner of each point and stretch it out till the opposite corner.

Click OK, and that’s it!

If you have any issues, contact us at support@unicomgroup.co.uk.

All you need is an internet connection and a USB or connected webcam (or IP Camera). Using the Unicom HCV software and cloud service, you’ll be able to view your camera online, from a PC, Mac or mobile device.

1. After you have signed up for a Unicom HCV account, our team will activate your account and send you a welcome email with your login details (this can take up to 24 hours). Once you login, it will take you to the Timeline page. From here, click on Add Camera.

2. Select Webcam, and name it whatever you’d like.

3. Adjust the settings however you’d like:

4. Press the “Finish & Start” button. A monitoring window like the one below will open.

5. To turn on Live View, highlight your camera of choice and click on the “Go Live!” button. Alternatively, you can also click on the drop down menu beside any camera’s name, then click on “Pop-out” to pop out a second screen. You can “Pop-out” as many cameras as you’d like.

You have now setup an online webcam viewer. It’s that easy. You can access this same page from any other web browser, or a mobile version of the page via your Android or iPhone.

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